Delaware Celebrates 4 Farms that Reached Century Mark

Pictured from l to r: State Rep. Harvey Kenton, USDA Farm Service Agency State Director Bob Walls, State Rep. John Atkins, State Rep. David L. Wilson and his wife, Carolyn, and State Rep. Bobby Outten, celebrate the Wilsons’ induction into the Delaware Century Farm Program. It was purchased in 1907 by Charles Wilson, grandfather of the current owner. Over the years it has produced corn, soybeans, strawberries and cucumbers.

Delaware has added four new farms to a growing list of farmland that have hit the 100 year mark. The four farms were inducted into Delaware’s Century Farm Program, which brings the total number to 121 statewide. “These families who farm generation after generation show a deep dedication and a love for the land,” said Gov. Jack Markell, who recognized the families during a ceremony honoring Delaware’s long agricultural heritage and historic roots. The families honored:

The Pepper Family (Thomas and Elizabeth Pepper), who own two farms from both sides of the family. The Pepper Farm is 34 acres and has been in the family since 1879. The Wilson Farm is 53 acres near and has been in the family since 1876. Both farms produce corn and soybeans.

The Wilson Family (State Rep. David L. and Carolyn Wilson) own a 105-acre farm that has been in the family since 1907 and produces corn and soybeans.

The Walls Family (Mildred Walls) owns a 54-acre farm that has been in the family since 1911 and is now in grain production.

The Breeding Family (Chris and Karen Breeding) own a 12.75-acre farm  that has been in the family since 1911 and produces beef cattle.

(from l to r) State Rep. Harvey Kenton, USDA Farm Service Agency State Director Bob Walls, State Rep. John Atkins, State Rep. David L. Wilson and his wife, Carolyn, and State Rep. Bobby Outten, celebrate the Wilsons’ induction into the Delaware Century Farm Program. It was purchased in 1907 by Charles Wilson, grandfather of the current owner. Over the years it has produced corn, soybeans, strawberries and cucumbers. Read more.

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